Bangladesh

Country Info

CARE started its operations in Bangladesh (then East Pakistan) in 1949. Today, CARE Bangladesh amplifies the voices of the poor and the marginalized in ways that influence public opinion, development practices, and policy at all levels by drawing on grassroots experience and relationships with civil society, government, and the private sector.

We have made a long-term commitment to specific marginalized and vulnerable groups to achieve a lasting impact on the underlying causes of poverty and social injustice.

Our Work in Bangladesh

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Market Access

More inclusive markets and access can help poor people improve their lives.

Microfinance

There’s a “savings revolution” taking place in many developing countries.

Youth Empowerment

Addressing the needs of the 1.8 billion young people in the world is critical to ending poverty.

Girls' Education

The majority of the 57 million children out of school are girls — their future is at risk.

Family Planning

Family planning is a proven strategy in reducing maternal mortality.

HIV & AIDS

Poverty is both a cause and consequence of HIV and AIDS.

Child Survival

This year, more than 7 million children will die before their 5th birthday.

Clean Water

Access to clean water and decent toilets saves lives and helps families and communities prosper.

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Maternal Health

Hundreds of thousands of women die in pregnancy and childbirth, mostly from preventable causes.

Agriculture

By failing to close the gender gap in agriculture, the world is paying dearly.

Climate Change

Climate change threatens the very survival of people living in poverty all over the world.

Child Nutrition

Malnutrition affects 200 million children and the consequences can last a lifetime.

Child Marriage

Child marriage is a gross human rights violation that puts young girls at great risk.

Violence Against Women

Gender-based violence is one of the most pervasive and yet least-recognized human rights abuses.

Why Women & Girls?

Why does CARE fight global poverty by focusing on women and girls? Because we have to.

Latest News from Bangladesh

Dressing for Success in Bangladesh

Getting Communities Involved In Setting Priorities and Gathering Data

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CARE believes in putting communities in the driver's seat to determine what projects should do, and if it's working to meet community needs.  One tool we use to accomplish this is the Participatory Performance Tracker (PPT).  This tool allows groups and individuals to evaluate project outcomes, behavior change, and barriers to success.  Groups at the community level compare objectives to outcomes, to hold themselves, their leaders, and CARE accountable for the goals we've set.  Outside facilitators work with groups to evaluate group dynamics and performance.  To effectively use the PPT, gro

Pathways to Empowerment Increases Food Security For 50,000 Women Farmers

With the generous support of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, CARE’s Pathways Program is based on the conviction that women farmers possess enormous potential to contribute to long-term food security for their families and substantially impact nutritional outcomes in sustainable ways.

CARE Knows How Living Blue Makes Green

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CARE has learned over the years how to harness the power of inclusive businesses to spur development. With the right support, these gateway enterprises have the potential to become powerful partners and vehicles for lasting change in areas where markets are underdeveloped.

Nijera Cottage and Village Industries (NCVI) is a worker- and artisan-owned social enterprise that represents groups that work in Bangladesh.

CARE Knows How a Case of Cow Envy Changed an Entire Village

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Work is hard to find in Koibortopara, the remote village in northern Bangladesh where Kallani and her family struggled for years to survive.

“We had no way out,” she says. “No food, no clothing, as we had no consistent income.”

Frustrated at being unable to provide for his family, Kallani’s husband was angry and sometimes violent. Though weary, Kallani kept looking for a path out of her family’s misery.

Community Agriculture Volunteer: A Successful Front-liner of the SHOUHARDO II Program

Agriculture is the single largest producing sector of the Bangladesh economy, and both the government and NGOs are providing extensive support to this sector. To provide the beneficiaries involved in agricultural activities with services at their doorstep, the SHOUHARDO II program facilitates Community Agriculture Volunteers. Community Agriculture Volunteers are working in program areas as a change maker.

12/3/14

No Religion Teaches Violence

"People of all faiths use religion as a reason to marry their children young, but no religion has ever sanctioned child marriage." Read about CARE's experiences of religion and Child Marr

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11/25/14

It's Time to Stop Digging Graves for Our Daughters

At the age of 22, Mariam[1] survived a rape, and thought her life was over.

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9/19/14

I Was A Child Groom

I don't remember very much about my wedding, just that there was a big party and I was carried to it in an ornate carriage. I was 8 years old. Rajkumari, my wife, was 7.

 

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