Sri Lanka

Country Info

CARE Sri Lanka was established in 1950 with a focus on food security and maternal and child health. Today, we work to address the root causes of poverty and marginalization of vulnerable groups by building the skills of communities and promoting good governance within both government and community organizations.

CARE Sri Lanka focuses on three main target groups in specific geographic areas:

  • poor rural communities in the dry zone
  • conflict-affected populations in the north and east
  • plantation residents

Following the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, CARE expanded its work to support tsunami survivors in seven of the worst-affected districts. 

Our Work in Sri Lanka

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Market Access

More inclusive markets and access can help poor people improve their lives.

Microfinance

There’s a “savings revolution” taking place in many developing countries.

Youth Empowerment

Addressing the needs of the 1.8 billion young people in the world is critical to ending poverty.

Girls' Education

The majority of the 57 million children out of school are girls — their future is at risk.

Clean Water

Access to clean water and decent toilets saves lives and helps families and communities prosper.

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Agriculture

By failing to close the gender gap in agriculture, the world is paying dearly.

Child Marriage

Child marriage is a gross human rights violation that puts young girls at great risk.

Violence Against Women

Gender-based violence is one of the most pervasive and yet least-recognized human rights abuses.

Why Women & Girls?

Why does CARE fight global poverty by focusing on women and girls? Because we have to.

CARE's Research: Why Masculinities Matter

The study, “Broadening gender: Why masculinities matter – a study on attitudes, practices and gender-based violence in four districts in Sri Lanka” was conducted by CARE International Sri Lanka, under the EMERGE project (Empowering Men to Engage and Redefine Gender Equality) and launched in April 2013. 

These Are Our Sisters

Gender-based violence is one of the most widespread – but least recognized – human rights abuses in the world. Globally, one out of three women will be beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused in her lifetime. This violence is happening to our sisters, mothers, grandmothers, aunts and daughters around the world.

This violence leaves survivors with long-term psychological and physical trauma; tears away at the social fabric of communities; and is used with terrifying effect in conflict settings, with women as the main target.

Pages