Tanzania

Country Info

CARE began working in Tanzania in April 1994, in response to the crisis in Rwanda and the subsequent influx of refugees into the Kagera Region of North-western Tanzania. Over the ensuing years, CARE Tanzania developed innovative education, health, microfinance, and environmental programs across most regions of the country.

 

Our Work in Tanzania

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Market Access

More inclusive markets and access can help poor people improve their lives.

Microfinance

There’s a “savings revolution” taking place in many developing countries.

Youth Empowerment

Addressing the needs of the 1.8 billion young people in the world is critical to ending poverty.

Girls' Education

The majority of the 57 million children out of school are girls — their future is at risk.

Family Planning

Family planning is a proven strategy in reducing maternal mortality.

HIV & AIDS

Poverty is both a cause and consequence of HIV and AIDS.

Clean Water

Access to clean water and decent toilets saves lives and helps families and communities prosper.

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Maternal Health

Hundreds of thousands of women die in pregnancy and childbirth, mostly from preventable causes.

Agriculture

By failing to close the gender gap in agriculture, the world is paying dearly.

Climate Change

Climate change threatens the very survival of people living in poverty all over the world.

Child Marriage

Child marriage is a gross human rights violation that puts young girls at great risk.

Violence Against Women

Gender-based violence is one of the most pervasive and yet least-recognized human rights abuses.

Why Women & Girls?

Why does CARE fight global poverty by focusing on women and girls? Because we have to.

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Policy makers focus on Food Security and Nutrition Programs

WASHINGTON, D.C. (February 21, 2013) - Rep. Betty McCollum, D-Minn., and several policy makers traveled with the global poverty-fighting organization CARE on a Learning Tour to South Sudan and Tanzania to better understand the challenges and solutions to food security and nutrition in each country.

Sports and Education

Whether it’s basketball or soccer, boxing or swimming, sport builds character and promotes teamwork. CARE’s Power Within signature program uses the convening power of sport to engage impoverished youth with each other and their communities. Our strategic combination of sports and education not only means more young people are going to school, but they are also learning leadership skills that can open doors to a better way of life.

Education Plus: A Policy Agenda to Unlock the Power of Girls

The world’s future will be largely shaped by today’s girls and tomorrow’s women. A growing body of evidence indicates that girls’ well-being is critical to progress on a range of developmental outcomes: an educated girl is more likely to delay marriage and childbirth, enjoy greater income and productivity and raise fewer, healthier and better-educated children.1 Indeed, investments in girls’ education may go further than any other spending in global development.

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