Newly Created “CARE Action” to Drive Stronger Engagement of CARE Advocates

Newly Created “CARE Action” to Drive Stronger Engagement of CARE Advocates

Publication info

Posted
5/2/16

More robust advocacy network offers members new tools and resources to deepen their impact on global poverty

WASHINGTON, D.C. (May 2, 2016) — The global poverty-fighting organization CARE announced today an enriched advocacy platform, CARE Action, to build upon its nationwide network of highly engaged, knowledgeable and passionate advocates committed to positive change and to improving the lives the world's most marginalized people. CARE launched the initiative, including a membership package and the new website CAREAction.org, during the organization’s national conference May 2-4 at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in the nation’s capital.

“CARE Action is a promising step forward as we continue mobilizing CARE advocates across the country with the tools they need to influence policy and change lives for the better,” said David Ray, CARE’s vice president for advocacy. “The new membership-based structure empowers long-time CARE advocates to take their engagement to the next level, and for newcomers to connect with our network for the first time.”

For as little as $20 annually, CARE Action members can tap into new tools and resources that will help deepen the impact they can have as they speak up on behalf of poor communities worldwide, including:

  • Quarterly calls that inform and connect members to CARE’s advocacy team in Washington, D.C., and to CARE experts in the field.
  • An annual virtual town hall during which members interact directly with CARE President and CEO Michelle Nunn as she shares her vision for empowering women and girls and bringing an end to global poverty.
  • A monthly “Inside Washington” update with the most up-to-date, inside information on issues affecting development and humanitarian policy.
  • An opportunity to help shape CARE’s advocacy agenda by promoting issues that resonate with members and their communities.

CARE Action membership donations will ensure that CARE can speak most clearly, compellingly and persuasively in order to bring about real change and real solutions.

Advocacy has long been a cornerstone of CARE’s work around the world, as more than 200,000 registered advocates have engaged in poverty issues and — through phone calls, letters, op-eds and other channels — urged their local and national leaders to support the issues that matter to CARE and to the millions of people living in extreme poverty around the world. One recent measure of the network’s effectiveness is the Global Food Security Act championed by CARE advocates over the past nine years.  Both the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representative voted to pass the act in April.

Once a single bill is agreed upon and signed into law, it will empower smallholder farmers – mostly women – to better feed their families and communities.

Although membership brings much value to advocates seeking deeper impact, those who choose not to join still can stay informed and engaged by signing up for email updates at CAREAction.org, where they can also find a range of opportunities to impact policy in Washington and to participate in local community events.  

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About CARE        

Founded in 1945 with the creation of the CARE Package®, CARE is a leading humanitarian organization fighting global poverty. CARE places special focus on working alongside women and girls because, equipped with the proper resources, they have the power to lift whole families and entire communities out of poverty. That’s why women and girls are at the heart of CARE’s community-based efforts to improve education and health, create economic opportunity, respond to emergencies and confront hunger. Last year CARE worked in 95 countries and reached more than 65 million people around the world. To learn more, visit www.care.org.

Media Contacts

Brian Feagans, bfeagans@care.org; 404-979-9453

Nicole Harris, nharris@care.org, 404-735-0871

 

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