Girls' Education

Children are naturally hungry to learn, but face daunting barriers to attending school, especially girls. CARE works to address the roots of those impediments as a way to increase learning opportunities.

Among those barriers are hunger, lower social status, chores, early marriage, school safety and sanitation.

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As I entered the hut, I paused. Pulling the end of my dupatta (piece of cloth used by women to cover their chest and head), I wiped off perspiration from my brow. Mariam came forward to greet me and holding my hand, led me inside her hut. She asked some seated women to create space between them and sat me down. She yelled to her daughter Rahmat to bring me something to drink. The child obliged. Mariam handed me a glass of sherbet (sweetened drink) which I drank slowly. Once I had had my fill, I handed back the glass to her.

Half of the world’s out-of-school children live in conflict-affected areas. Getting those children back to school can save their lives, their health – and their futures.

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Up until two months ago, 13-year-old Sangita Devi had never set foot in a school. She grew up in a household in India where she and her older sister assumed all of the responsibilities while her two brothers were in school.

Sangita's father died of cancer when her mother was six-months pregnant. Then, her sister married and her mother became ill with migraines and couldn't work.

The full burden of all the cooking and cleaning fell on young Sangita's shoulders. At one point she was alone in the kitchen making a meal for nearly 60 people.

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