Violence Against Women

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ATLANTA (Nov. 21, 2013) — CARE USA hailed the introduction today of H.R. 3571, the International Violence Against Women Act (IVAWA), by Reps. Jan Schakowsky (D-IL), Nita Lowey (D-NY), Richard Hanna (R-NY), Eliot Engel (D-NY), Chris Gibson (R-NY) and Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL). This bipartisan legislation aims to make ending gender-based violence (GBV) a top diplomatic priority of the United States.

Experiencing, witnessing and perpetrating violence is an all too common reality for boys growing up in this post-conflict environment, which is still marred by the violent breakup of the former Yugoslavia in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

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The “bead game” was designed to address some of the pressure women in certain cultures feel to give birth to boy children, and reduce the stigma placed upon women who give birth to girls.

With the help of two colored beads representing the X and Y chromosomes, the game demonstrated how the sex of a child is determined.

The key point, that it is a chromosome from the man that determines the sex of the child, was overwhelmingly popular with the women, who said they were often blamed by their husbands or families if they did not produce a baby boy.

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She was a top student. Now, violence and bullying keep her from school.

 

Raghad, age 11, should be in 5th grade, but hasn’t been to school in two-and-a-half years because she and her family have had to move so many times during the Syrian conflict.

A refugee in Jordan now, Raghad’s face lights up and her words come quick when she talks about her old life in Syria. What it was like to walk home from school with friends and gossip about their teachers, do homework and chores after school, and then play with her cousins, who lived nearby.

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