Women & Children in Emergencies

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CARE Focusing on Women and Children Caught in Gaza Fighting

JERUSALEM  —  Despite a slowdown in fighting following an initial 12-hour ceasefire declaration on Saturday, the situation in Gaza remains highly volatile with continuous attacks in both directions. According to UN sources, more than 1,000 Palestinians, most of them civilians, have died since the beginning of the conflict. On the Israeli side, 46 people, three of them civilians, have lost their lives. More than 200,000 people in Gaza have sought refuge in UN buildings.

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Aid workers from the humanitarian aid agency CARE are warning of the colossal strain on medical services and hospitals in Gaza as the violence there continues. Hospitals are being used as places of refuge with people sleeping on the floors and corridors. The continuing bombardment is preventing urgent medical supplies from entering Gaza.

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Jerusalem — CARE and its partners are preparing to provide emergency mobile health teams to serve people affected by the violence in Gaza. Needs are particularly high for pregnant women and for those who can’t travel to hospitals or medical clinics. Pregnant women are traveling to hospitals in the midst of the bombing to get medical support, while other people are unable or unwilling to leave their houses for anything other than life-threatening injuries.

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Aid agencies face closure of projects as money fails to arrive

A group of seven major international aid agencies said they face a shortfall of $89 million just when the South Sudan humanitarian crisis edges closer to the risk of famine. Speaking out on the 3rd anniversary of the country’s independence they warned their aid efforts to help hundreds of thousands of people caught up in the conflict was under threat due to a lack of funds.

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Continuing conflict and start of rainy season put women and their children at risk of starvation

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Three years ago, the world witnessed the birth of a new nation, as the people of South Sudan united in eager, hopeful anticipation. People sang independence songs, and a huge clock in the centre of Juba, the capital, counted down the days. Today, the picture is quite different. The head of our South Sudan office describes a nightmarish, “soul-destroying” situation: never in her 20-year career has she had to sit by and watch people near starvation – with not enough funding to do anything about it.

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OSLO, Norway  – As the world’s donors and governments gather in Olso, Norway tomorrow to discuss how best to respond to the conflict and looming food crisis in South Sudan, CARE International warns of a wave of sexual violence that is worsening as the emergency in the country deepens.

CARE helped Somali children write letters to Syrian children

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