Angola

CARE started operations in Angola in 1989, focusing on emergency humanitarian assistance including food, health, water, sanitation, and one urban development program. In 2002, when the 30-year civil war ended, CARE’s programs shifted to the areas of rights, good governance and decentralization in both urban and rural areas.

On June 29th, 2012, after almost 23 years of operations, CARE Angola closed its doors. Since 1989, CARE has implemented projects in emergency relief, rehabilitation and development in 10 provinces. In the initial years of operations, CARE focused on providing food to save lives, creating jobs through food-for-work activities, and improving access to water, sanitation and health services. After the war, CARE implemented a program to resettle more than 1.2 million internally displaced persons (IDPs). Since 2005, CARE has focused most of its efforts on supporting the government to reduce poverty and social exclusion. These programs had a specific focus on early childhood development, water and sanitation, agricultural development, and women’s economic empowerment. CARE’s approach has been adopted by local entities and, hopefully, will continue to flourish once CARE leaves.

1/4/17

The Plight and Promise in Southern Africa

Southern Africa is a source of great people, potential and possibility. It’s also right now a place of great challenge and uncertainty, as extreme weather conditions such as El Niño have produced a severe drought that threatens 40 million people.

9/30/13

Kididi Hope

My name is Maria Elisabeth Avindio. In 1989, a war broke out in the area around Andulo – the town where I used to live here in Angola – and my family was in danger living there.

9/30/13

Humanitarian Consequences of War

For more than 50 years, CARE has helped people survive war and rebuild in its aftermath. This work is integral to our poverty-fighting mission because the brutal consequences of war last long after the guns are silent.

9/30/13

Humanitarian Consequences of War

For more than 50 years, CARE has helped people survive war and rebuild in its aftermath. This work is integral to our poverty-fighting mission because the brutal consequences of war last long after the guns are silent.