2/12/14

The Nation (Malawi) - Dowa Women on the Rise

For a long time, women from Kamtayeni Village in Traditional Authority Chiwere in the central district of Dowa have been suffering in ignorance of their rights. Most of them never knew about their basic rights, let alone how to claim those rights.

10/16/13

Rhoda Chaima's Three Years in Secondary School

“Please Henry don’t talk to me in vernacular, I don’t want to be punished once my colleagues and teachers hear me talking our vernacular while in the campus.”

Rhoda Chaima

10/16/13

Girl Most Likely To: Cultivate Lasting Change

She just became the most educated person in her family.

 

Orphaned at age 13, Jenifer was raised by her aunts, whom she affectionately calls her “other mothers.” They’re subsistence farmers who live in a tiny mud-brick home with Jenifer and her sister.  

10/2/13

Empowering Girls to Learn and Lead

The Power to Lead Alliance (PTLA) aimed to create, strengthen, and scale-up diverse leadership opportunities for girls in six countries [Egypt, Honduras, India, Malawi, Tanzania, and Yemen] through extra-curricular activities, social ne

10/2/13

Fill Hearts, Minds and Bellies

In developed countries like the United States your earning potential is often based on the number of diplomas you have. But in rural Malawi, completing even a primary education is one of the most precious things anyone can achieve.

7/11/13

Obama’s Fantastic Boring Idea

The farm fields here are cemeteries of cornstalks: a severe drought has left them brown, withered and dead. Normally, a failed crop like that signifies starvation.

3/8/13

The Pathways Challenge: She’s Growing It, He’s Getting the Credit, Everyone Is Losing

In Africa, the majority of food is grown by women, yet women own less than 2 percent of the world’s land, access only 10 percent of agricultural credit, and are routinely – systematically?

3/1/13

Pathways to Transformation for Smallholder Women

"For one to be productive, you need to have access to resources and to markets," says Henry Swira. "And it's easier for men to have access to resources, because that's how traditionally it's been constructed, when actually it is women who do 70 per cent of the work in the field." 

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