Refugees

6/7/13

Humanitarian NGOs: Fund Syria Response Now Before It's Too Late

(June 7, 2013) - A group of 21 international aid agencies working in six countries directly affected by the Syrian crisis calls on the international community to dig deep and be generous in responding to the UN's new Syria and refugee response appeals, being launched today.

1/11/13

Crisis in DRC: In South Masisi, People Speak of Hunger and Despair

On December 15, a CARE team returned from an evaluation mission to South Masisi territory in the North Kivu Province of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) ’” the first one to take place in the region by any humanitarian organization.

Interview: “Urban refugees are struggling more and more to survive”

Half a million Syrian refugees living in urban areas in Jordan are struggling more than ever to cope with inadequate housing, high debts, rising costs of living and educational challenges for their children, CARE International has found in a new study.

I Came Here Because I Need Peace and a Hospital

For three Syrian women who escaped the war, the main thing about Azraq refugee camp is that people are not trying to kill each other. “I cannot see more violence” says Safa (20).

I Used to Live in a Palace

Sabeen is a Palestinian refugee from Syria who fled to Lebanon a year and a half ago with eight of her children, a daughter-in-law and four grandchildren.  A son and a brother were left behind in Syria.  The son wanted to join them but was unable to get a visa.

Sahel Regional Crisis: Starting over in Sayam

A growing family struggles to survive in a refugee camp supported by CARE in Niger.

I Will Raise My Children in This Tent

A 45-minute drive from Amman, the capital of Jordan, a bumpy road leads to a sea of tents. Children are playing next to big barrels filled with rainwater, rusty cages with chickens and goats, and burning piles of rubbish. Sahab, aged 24, sits on a thin brown mattress in one of the tents.

I Feel Powerless

The light goes on and off. It flickers for a few seconds, and then everything turns dark again. Hala sits on the floor of her small room in Beirut. Ahmed, one of her five sons, runs to one of the room’s corners. Unerringly he climbs over a suitcase which lies around.

Pages