Mozambique

Country Info

CARE began operations in Mozambique in 1986 with emergency assistance and food distribution for people who were affected by the protracted war between government and rebel forces.

From 1990 to 1994, CARE expanded its project portfolio to include disaster recovery and development activities. Following the end of the war in 1992, we focus on implementing long-term development projects in the following sectors:

  • local water management
  • sanitation and hygiene
  • natural resource management and food security
  • health and HIV/AIDS
  • microfinance
  • governance

It is important to note that women are often the most vulnerable to shocks and the most marginalized. Hence, they often suffer the most from natural emergencies and not able to participate as fully in development efforts unless deliberate, strategic actions are taken. This has long-term implications for overall development and ability to reduce poverty if those most marginalized do not participate in the processes.

Our Work in Mozambique

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Market Access

More inclusive markets and access can help poor people improve their lives.

Microfinance

There’s a “savings revolution” taking place in many developing countries.

Youth Empowerment

Addressing the needs of the 1.8 billion young people in the world is critical to ending poverty.

Girls' Education

The majority of the 57 million children out of school are girls — their future is at risk.

Family Planning

Family planning is a proven strategy in reducing maternal mortality.

HIV & AIDS

Poverty is both a cause and consequence of HIV and AIDS.

Child Survival

This year, more than 7 million children will die before their 5th birthday.

Clean Water

Access to clean water and decent toilets saves lives and helps families and communities prosper.

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Maternal Health

Hundreds of thousands of women die in pregnancy and childbirth, mostly from preventable causes.

Agriculture

By failing to close the gender gap in agriculture, the world is paying dearly.

Climate Change

Climate change threatens the very survival of people living in poverty all over the world.

Child Nutrition

Malnutrition affects 200 million children and the consequences can last a lifetime.

Child Marriage

Child marriage is a gross human rights violation that puts young girls at great risk.

Violence Against Women

Gender-based violence is one of the most pervasive and yet least-recognized human rights abuses.

Why Women & Girls?

Why does CARE fight global poverty by focusing on women and girls? Because we have to.

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CARE Cornell Research Partnership

CARE Cornell Research Partnership

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Bringing together superb research capacities and an unparalleled global reach and depth of community relationships, CARE and Cornell University are working together in a new collaboration to create sustainable solutions targeting global concerns, including world hunger and climate change. The effort is focused on the most vulnerable populations, especially women and families. 

For a preschooler, her grandmother’s participation opened a door to education

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Esperança Miguel Vilanculos is an eager 3-year old girl who attends preschool in Mozambique. She now lives with her maternal grandmother Rita as her parents are away, earning a living selling charcoal about 63 miles from the city of Vilankulo in the Chiruala community. Rita explained that she took Esperança as her dependent, because it is customary to do so in their community, and, it allows Esperança to help her grandmother with household chores.

Communities and Girl’s Education: The Sound of Progress

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Learn how increased income meant educational opportunities for the children of one group of mothers.

Gracienda Antonio sets the dry stalks ablaze and watches smoke billow up into the blue skies of northern Mozambique. Burning the fields after harvest is a tradition among small farmers in Nampula, a poor province whose families are no strangers to hunger.

3/10/15

Anastacia Makes Things Happen

International Women’s Day might be my favorite day of the year. It gives me a chance to reflect on all of the amazing women that I get to work with every day.


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1/26/15

Malawi: Recounting the Loss From Flood Disaster

Mathews Damiano hails from Brighton village in traditional authority Mbenje in Nsanje.

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1/26/15

Malawi: A Story of Loss

​At Nyachilenda campsite we met Grace Lawrence, a 20-year old woman from Nyachikanda village, traditional authority Ndamera in Nsanje.

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