Philippines

Typhoon Haiyan

CARE is providing food, shelter and other lifesaving essentials to survivors of the storm, which affected up to 16.1 million people, displaced 4.1 million and killed thousands of men, women and children.

CARE Is There

Learn more about what CARE is doing to help survivors of super typhoon Haiyan, which tore a deadly path across the Philippines.

Country Info

CARE has a long history in the Philippines that stretches back to 1949. For decades, we've been providing emergency relief when disaster strikes and helping communities prepare for disasters. We were there in 2009 when typhoon Ketsana hit and again in 2012 when typhoon Bopha ripped through the country.

CARE is currently on the ground providing food, shelter and other essentials to survivors of Typhoon Haiyan, which has torn a path across central Philippines, affecting an estimated 9.8 million people and killing as many as 10,000.

Our Work in Philippines

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Child Marriage

Child marriage is a gross human rights violation that puts young girls at great risk.

Why Women & Girls?

Why does CARE fight global poverty by focusing on women and girls? Because we have to.

ATLANTA  — Six months after Typhoon Haiyan slammed the central Philippines, the global humanitarian organization CARE is expanding its efforts to help survivors rebuild their homes and livelihoods.

“Some good strides have been made in the transition from an emergency to early recovery phase,” says Lex Kassenberg, CARE’s country director in the Philippines. “Still, too many families in the worst-hit areas continue to live in makeshift shelters, while many of those who have started to rebuild or repair their damaged houses have yet to complete their homes.”

Juliet Inisa is a single mother of three children ages 13, five and two. She had to work hard on her own to provide for her kids.

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The destruction caused as Typhoon Haiyan tore a path across the central Philippines on November 7 and 8 is catastrophic.

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"With CARE's help, we can now look forward to a house that is built better," says Emma.

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Wilma remains faithful that her new baby will be a bearer of good fortune for their family.

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Aileen was thrilled when she found out CARE and its local partner would be distributing shelter repair kits.

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Lyza's decisiveness and courage saved four lives, including that of her unborn baby.

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For Rolando Creado, 64, the safest place was to head to the mountains.

A rice farmer in the village of San Miguelay, about a 45 minute drive from Tacloban City in Leyte, Philippines, he knew things would be bad. After all, in a typical year, his village is flooded about six or seven times from various storms, thanks to a nearby river.

Typhoon Haiyan was imminent, with the threat of ferocious winds and heavy rains. So Rolando, his wife, son and grandchild headed to higher ground.

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