Niger

Country Info

CARE Niger was established in 1974 in response to famine and has worked on several food security projects since then. The program currently focuses on health and nutrition, natural resources management, education, local governance, conflict resolution, women’s empowerment, microfinance, disaster risk reduction, and emergency preparedness and response.

Niger is the birthplace of our successful and often-replicated Village Savings and Loan Associations program, which economically empowers women and raises their social and political status. The project is known as ‘Mata Masu Dubara’ (MMD), or “ingenious women” or “women on the move.”

Since 2009, CARE Niger has been focusing on creating partnerships with civil society to encourage more sustainable development. The Strategic Plan for 2010-2015 emphasizes disaster risk reduction, strengthens emergency response and prevention, and aims to help create sustainable livelihoods for 150,000 households in extreme poverty.

Our Work in Niger

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Market Access

More inclusive markets and access can help poor people improve their lives.

Microfinance

There’s a “savings revolution” taking place in many developing countries.

Youth Empowerment

Addressing the needs of the 1.8 billion young people in the world is critical to ending poverty.

Girls' Education

The majority of the 57 million children out of school are girls — their future is at risk.

Family Planning

Family planning is a proven strategy in reducing maternal mortality.

Child Survival

This year, more than 7 million children will die before their 5th birthday.

Clean Water

Access to clean water and decent toilets saves lives and helps families and communities prosper.

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Maternal Health

Hundreds of thousands of women die in pregnancy and childbirth, mostly from preventable causes.

Climate Change

Climate change threatens the very survival of people living in poverty all over the world.

Child Marriage

Child marriage is a gross human rights violation that puts young girls at great risk.

Violence Against Women

Gender-based violence is one of the most pervasive and yet least-recognized human rights abuses.

Why Women & Girls?

Why does CARE fight global poverty by focusing on women and girls? Because we have to.

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Men Engage Initiative: CARE Niger (2011-2013)

The Men Engage Initiative in Niger is part of the women’s empowerment program that focuses on working with men as allies and people who benefit from women’s equality.  The program works to get men involved in more household work and many anti-poverty programs.  Some of its activities are:

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Updated January 2014

CARE has conducted our emergency response operations in Chad, Mali and Niger, reaching people in these countries with immediate lifesaving assistance and long-term programs that address resilience among the most vulnerable people in the face of recurring crises by: 

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Chronic crisis?

"The world needs to accept that many parts of Niger and the Sahel are now in a state of chronic crisis," explained Barbara Jackson, Humanitarian Director, CARE International, in 2012.

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The thick calloused soles of the feet of the women with whom I sat in the tiny village of Maijanjaré in Niger, seven hours by road away from the capital Niamey, tell their own story. It is a story of many hardships, of back-breaking labor to dig a bit of land in extremely rocky, hard and dry soil in order to plant and hopefully harvest a bit of millet. It is a story of having to walk two hours each day to collect water.

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LOOKING FORWARD: Mamata Tinou, Niger

During Niger's drought of 2005, people in the village of Genki walked for hours in the blazing heat, searching for food to feed themselves and their children.

Yet last year, when even worse conditions beset Niger, villagers in Genki stayed put. They were well-fed and so was their livestock. The village's cereal bank was full. Amid one of the world's worst hunger crises — at its peak more than 7 million Nigerians were without adequate food — people from nearby villages traveled to Genki for its excess grain.

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