Syria

2014 Recap: A Dire Year for Syrian Refugees

CARE looks back on the last 12 months working with Syrian refugees. 

SYRIA: Images From Inside

An illustration of the life Syrian refugees left behind, images shared with CARE Syrian refugee volunteers, as captured by their family who have remained behind.

Young Voices From Syria

We asked five young Syrian refugees to share their dreams and a message to the world. What they had to say was both heartbreaking and inspiring.

More than 2.8 million people have fled the country

You can help us reach people in desperate need and support our poverty-fighting programs by making your tax-deductible gift today.

Country Info

CARE began operating in Syria in 2013 by providing lifesaving emergency assistance to people affected by the conflict in Syria. We are providing food and emergency supplies to families, psychosocial support to children and emergency medical equipment and support for women.

Our Work in Syria

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Child Marriage

Child marriage is a gross human rights violation that puts young girls at great risk.

LS: Syria Crisis Box Fact 1

Get The Facts

Four million children are devastated and an entire generation is at risk.

LS: Syria Crisis Box 5

Press Release

"Words alone are not enough.”

LS: Syria Crisis Box 6 Women Children

LS: Syria Crisis Box Fact 2

Get The Facts

Almost half of the population of Syria is displaced or in need of assistance.

Latest News from Syria

Syria Crisis: Aid Agencies to host “Life in Refuge” in Washington D.C. March 27-28

Inside Syria - Ibrahim: A Childhood Suspended

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It never occurred to 8-year-old Ibrahim that his capacity to speak could so easily disappear. But after heavy bombing of his neighborhood, he inexplicably lost the ability to form words.  The extreme fear he experienced during the bombing stole his voice, his mother says. Ibrahim left school after the incident and lost touch with his friends who had difficulty communicating with their friend.

The War is Not Only in Syria, The War is Inside Us

Healing the scars: CARE's work with Syrian refugees in Egypt

"I wake up crying every morning and there is not a single night I don't have nightmares," says an elderly woman.

"My husband is detained in Syria and I have not heard from him in two months," cries a young mother with two small children on her lap.

"I think about suicide every single second and minute," says an elderly man.

No, There's No Elevator

“Is there an elevator ?” I’m pretty sure I know the answer to this question before I ask Hanadi, a wheelchair-bound Syrian refugee in her late twenties. She lives with relatives in a multistory apartment building in a poor area of northern Jordan—specifically, on the fourth floor. Unlike thousands of Syrians who have been wounded and permanently disabled during the country’s civil war, Hanadi’s leg problems have been with her since childhood. But the challenges are the same. Right now they take the shape of 60-odd steps between her and the rest of the world.

She Was Still Playing with Dolls When She Married

Seven months ago 8-year-old Aamina had to flee from her home in Aleppo to Lebanon. “We were the last ones to leave our neighbourhood. All the houses were bombed. The streets were full of rubble and dirt. It looked like a ghost town.”  Aamina’s new home is in Sabra, one of the most impoverished and highly populated parts of Beirut. Sabra was set up more than 60 years ago as a camp for Palestinian refugees. In the past months and years, more and more Syrian refugees like Aamina and her family have arrived here. They cannot afford to live anywhere else.

I Feel Powerless

The light goes on and off. It flickers for a few seconds, and then everything turns dark again. Hala sits on the floor of her small room in Beirut. Ahmed, one of her five sons, runs to one of the room’s corners. Unerringly he climbs over a suitcase which lies around. He knows exactly which lumps and bumps he has to watch out for. In Sabra, one of the poorest and most densely populated areas of the Lebanese capital, the electricity hardly ever works. It gets dark early here, but the light bulb never lasts longer than a few minutes.

I Will Raise My Children in This Tent

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A 45-minute drive from Amman, the capital of Jordan, a bumpy road leads to a sea of tents. Children are playing next to big barrels filled with rainwater, rusty cages with chickens and goats, and burning piles of rubbish. Sahab, aged 24, sits on a thin brown mattress in one of the tents. One hand caresses her one-year-old son Khalil’s* hair; the other rests on her belly. In three months Sahab is due to give birth to her second son. ‘I will raise my children in this tent,’ she says,  and sounds as if she had to convince herself of this fact.

School is Not An Option

A dusty road in the city of Irbid in the North of Jordan, about an hour's drive from the Syrian border. Box-shaped houses with small, barred windows are strung together. White colour chips off brown walls, wires are hanging down, rubble piles at the side of the street. Ten year old Maraa lives in one of these houses. A narrow, naked staircase leads to her flat on the second floor. Maraa's mother opens the door and welcomes us into her living room, which serves as both living room and bedroom. Carpets are lying on the cold ground, a light bulb hangs from the ceiling.

I Used to Live in a Palace

Sabeen is a Palestinian refugee from Syria who fled to Lebanon a year and a half ago with eight of her children, a daughter-in-law and four grandchildren.  A son and a brother were left behind in Syria.  The son wanted to join them but was unable to get a visa. He tried to smuggle himself into the country but was arrested, detained for two months, and sent back to Syria.  This family might not be in Lebanon much longer anyway. All family members have expired Lebanese visas and are vulnerable to refoulement, or forced return to Syria.

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