Rwanda

Country Info

 

From 1984 to 1994, CARE Rwanda implemented a range of development projects, including maternal health care, forestry and water and sanitation activities. As a result of the civil war in Rwanda, we closed our Kigali office from April to July 1994 while conducting cross-border relief from Uganda to 150,000 displaced people in eastern Rwanda, and from Burundi and Zaire (now DRC) to 120,000 displaced in southwest Rwanda. Emergency operations included the distribution of shelter, food, basic domestic survival items, water, seeds and tools.

At the height of the emergency efforts in 1994, CARE Rwanda assisted an estimated 1.5 million internally displaced people, refugee returnees and impoverished local residents. CARE has since has built a significant rehabilitation and development program.

CARE Rwanda is currently working in six prefectures in response to expressed needs and requests of relevant government ministries. Projects now include AIDS prevention, water-system rehabilitation and community management of water systems, health education, agroforestry and sustainable land use management, community-assisted shelter projects and promotion of women's agricultural production.

Our Work in Rwanda

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Market Access

More inclusive markets and access can help poor people improve their lives.

Microfinance

There’s a “savings revolution” taking place in many developing countries.

Youth Empowerment

Addressing the needs of the 1.8 billion young people in the world is critical to ending poverty.

Girls' Education

The majority of the 57 million children out of school are girls — their future is at risk.

Family Planning

Family planning is a proven strategy in reducing maternal mortality.

HIV & AIDS

Poverty is both a cause and consequence of HIV and AIDS.

Clean Water

Access to clean water and decent toilets saves lives and helps families and communities prosper.

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Maternal Health

Hundreds of thousands of women die in pregnancy and childbirth, mostly from preventable causes.

Climate Change

Climate change threatens the very survival of people living in poverty all over the world.

Child Marriage

Child marriage is a gross human rights violation that puts young girls at great risk.

Violence Against Women

Gender-based violence is one of the most pervasive and yet least-recognized human rights abuses.

Why Women & Girls?

Why does CARE fight global poverty by focusing on women and girls? Because we have to.

The month of April marks 20 years since the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. CARE pauses to remember the thousands of lives that were lost and honor those who were taken away too soon and too tragically. We pledge to continue working with the people of Rwanda towards a stronger future that is beneficial for all. And we ask the world to join us in the spirit of this year’s commemoration theme to remember, unite and renew.

Image (media): 

The “bead game” was designed to address some of the pressure women in certain cultures feel to give birth to boy children, and reduce the stigma placed upon women who give birth to girls.

With the help of two colored beads representing the X and Y chromosomes, the game demonstrated how the sex of a child is determined.

The key point, that it is a chromosome from the man that determines the sex of the child, was overwhelmingly popular with the women, who said they were often blamed by their husbands or families if they did not produce a baby boy.

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Solar lamps are a simple, fundamental intervention that can improve the lives of the rural poor in Rwanda.

Having no electricity, families traditionally rely on kerosene or battery power to light their homes at night.

These energy sources are not only expensive – even unaffordable to families living on less than $2.50 a day – but also present environmental, health and safety concerns.

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