Afghanistan

Country Info

CARE first established its mission in Afghanistan in 1961, but suspended activities after the Russian invasion of 1979. Resuming activities in 1989 from a new base in Peshawar, Pakistan, CARE delivered assistance to Afghanistan from across the border until 2002 when it shifted its main office back to Kabul. 

Each program strives to strengthen self-reliance while promoting basic human rights, good governance, and social, economic and gender equality. In addition to its community-based work, CARE Afghanistan advocates with and on behalf of vulnerable and marginalized Afghans for national and international policies that support and protect their interests and maximize their chances to break out of the cycle of poverty.

Our Work in Afghanistan

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Market Access

More inclusive markets and access can help poor people improve their lives.

Microfinance

There’s a “savings revolution” taking place in many developing countries.

Youth Empowerment

Addressing the needs of the 1.8 billion young people in the world is critical to ending poverty.

Girls' Education

The majority of the 57 million children out of school are girls — their future is at risk.

Family Planning

Family planning is a proven strategy in reducing maternal mortality.

Child Survival

This year, more than 7 million children will die before their 5th birthday.

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Maternal Health

Hundreds of thousands of women die in pregnancy and childbirth, mostly from preventable causes.

Agriculture

By failing to close the gender gap in agriculture, the world is paying dearly.

Child Nutrition

Malnutrition affects 200 million children and the consequences can last a lifetime.

Child Marriage

Child marriage is a gross human rights violation that puts young girls at great risk.

Why Women & Girls?

Why does CARE fight global poverty by focusing on women and girls? Because we have to.

These Are Our Sisters

Gender-based violence is one of the most widespread – but least recognized – human rights abuses in the world. Globally, one out of three women will be beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused in her lifetime. This violence is happening to our sisters, mothers, grandmothers, aunts and daughters around the world.

This violence leaves survivors with long-term psychological and physical trauma; tears away at the social fabric of communities; and is used with terrifying effect in conflict settings, with women as the main target.

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When CARE opened the first-ever girls’ school in Mali Khail, Afghanistan, it kindled the dreams of 13-year-old Malalai.

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For more than 50 years, CARE has helped people survive war and rebuild in its aftermath. This work is integral to our poverty-fighting mission because the brutal consequences of war last long after the guns are silent. People cannot overcome poverty when their village has been plundered, when the schoolhouse has been bombed or when the fields' only fruits are deadly landmines.

Image (media): 

For more than 50 years, CARE has helped people survive war and rebuild in its aftermath. This work is integral to our poverty-fighting mission because the brutal consequences of war last long after the guns are silent. People cannot overcome poverty when their village has been plundered, when the schoolhouse has been bombed or when the fields' only fruits are deadly landmines.

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