Ethiopia

Looking to the Future

In 2011, a catastrophic drought struck the Horn of Africa, affecting Somalia, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Kenya. CARE continues its work there, helping communities become increasingly resilient for the future. 

The Horn of Africa Food and Refugee Crisis: One Year On

Responding to Crisis

Liz McLaughlin, Executive Director of CARE's Foundation Unit, traveled to the Horn of Africa in 2011 to see CARE's response to this massive emergency. She captured her journey on camera. 

Fighting Poverty & Drought with Honeybees

Nuriya, an Ethiopian mother of six children, has been able to make ends meet on her own since her husband passed away 11 years ago. By farming bees, a trade usually engaged by men, Nuriya is able to provide for her family.

Country Info

CARE started working in Ethiopia in 1984 in response to severe drought and famine that devastated the population and claimed the lives of nearly one million people. Since then, the organization’s activities have expanded to address the root causes of poverty and vulnerability.

As part of CARE Ethiopia’s development of a focused and long-term program approach to poverty, the office targets three groups of people:

  • pastoralist girls
  • chronically food-insecure rural women
  • poor young girls living in cities and on the outskirts of urban areas

Our Work in Ethiopia

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Market Access

More inclusive markets and access can help poor people improve their lives.

Microfinance

There’s a “savings revolution” taking place in many developing countries.

Family Planning

Family planning is a proven strategy in reducing maternal mortality.

Child Survival

This year, more than 7 million children will die before their 5th birthday.

Clean Water

Access to clean water and decent toilets saves lives and helps families and communities prosper.

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Maternal Health

Hundreds of thousands of women die in pregnancy and childbirth, mostly from preventable causes.

Child Nutrition

Malnutrition affects 200 million children and the consequences can last a lifetime.

Child Marriage

Child marriage is a gross human rights violation that puts young girls at great risk.

Violence Against Women

Gender-based violence is one of the most pervasive and yet least-recognized human rights abuses.

Why Women & Girls?

Why does CARE fight global poverty by focusing on women and girls? Because we have to.

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When Tino was 9, she spent her days tending to small animals in her pastorialist village in Ethiopia. The child had never attended school, and was barely old enough to have a passing understanding of cultural traditions in her village. But that all changed after her much-older sister died in childbirth. A few months after her sister's death, Tino noticed village elders visiting her and having lengthy talks with her parents.

In a small, rural village in northern Ethiopia, Fikere and her husband Kasa would like to have three children – two boys and a girl. Late at night, after a hard day’s work on the farm, they talk about sending their kids to school and dream that they will finish university and get good jobs. Yet there was a time not that long a go when discussions like this were a pipe dream for 18-year-old Fikere. Her husband used to be distant and bossy, and never listened to her views. She had resigned herself to doing what he said to avoid being hurt.

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Twelve-year-old Eleni* was so excited to be receiving new clothes from her parents that she didn’t ask why until it was too late. Dressed in a new t-shirt and skirt she was greeted liked a princess by family and neighbors. As the sun rose higher in the sky, guests started to arrive at her house, goats were slaughtered to feed the gathering crowd, and she was brought before her soon-to-be husband for the first time.

These Are Our Sisters

Gender-based violence is one of the most widespread – but least recognized – human rights abuses in the world. Globally, one out of three women will be beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused in her lifetime. This violence is happening to our sisters, mothers, grandmothers, aunts and daughters around the world.

This violence leaves survivors with long-term psychological and physical trauma; tears away at the social fabric of communities; and is used with terrifying effect in conflict settings, with women as the main target.

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It takes a lot of strength to carry 55 pounds of water for more than four hours across eastern Ethiopia’s arid highlands. It also takes particular strength to change the circumstances that force women to shoulder that burden.

Fatuma Muhammed is strong in both these ways, and more.

The Family Planning Results Initiative was implemented in Rwanda, Kenya, and Ethiopia with the goal of increasing and sustaining the use of family planning.

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