Philippines

Typhoon Haiyan

CARE is providing food, shelter and other lifesaving essentials to survivors of the storm, which affected up to 16.1 million people, displaced 4.1 million and killed thousands of men, women and children.

CARE Is There

Learn more about what CARE is doing to help survivors of super typhoon Haiyan, which tore a deadly path across the Philippines.

Country Info

CARE has a long history in the Philippines that stretches back to 1949. For decades, we've been providing emergency relief when disaster strikes and helping communities prepare for disasters. We were there in 2009 when typhoon Ketsana hit and again in 2012 when typhoon Bopha ripped through the country.

CARE is currently on the ground providing food, shelter and other essentials to survivors of Typhoon Haiyan, which has torn a path across central Philippines, affecting an estimated 9.8 million people and killing as many as 10,000.

Our Work in Philippines

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Child Marriage

Child marriage is a gross human rights violation that puts young girls at great risk.

Why Women & Girls?

Why does CARE fight global poverty by focusing on women and girls? Because we have to.

Nearly a week after the storm, there are still thousands of people without electricity and drinking water. But in some places there are signs of hope.

"The typhoon caused huge devastation, so obviously access has been a problem," Nick Osborne, Vice President of Program, Partnerships, Learning and Advocacy for CARE, said.

A Filipino community in Fort Washington, Md., waits to hear from family members.

The Philippines government is committed to providing electricity to the areas hardest hit by Typhoon Haiyan by Dec. 24 in time for Christmas.

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MANILA (Nov. 20, 2013) — Families devastated by Typhoon Haiyan are joining CARE’s aid distribution efforts in central Philippines, as communities previously cut off receive critical food and supplies.

More than 4,000 people have been confirmed dead. And an estimated 13 million people have been affected by the typhoon, with 4 million forced from their homes — more than the entire population of Oregon.

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In the space of a week, Jocelyn Gonato faced two life-altering storms. A mother of three living on the island of Leyte in the Philippines, she found herself hanging on for dear life while Typhoon Yolanda’s winds shook her small shanty. But as powerful as the typhoon grew, it wasn’t the only thing tearing apart her home.

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As the extent of the damage caused by Typhoon Haiyan begins to emerge, CARE is working to deliver emergency aid to families impacted by one of the worst storms ever recorded.

The destruction across a chain of Philippine islands leaves authorities with a complicated relief operation, on a scale exceeding any other in the history of the disaster-prone nation.

Now there are concerns parts of the Philippines are descending into chaos as International aid organizations, like CARE are mobilizing to help.

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