Jordan

2014 Recap: A Dire Year for Syrian Refugees

CARE looks back on the last 12 months working with Syrian refugees. 

SYRIA: Images From Inside

An illustration of the life Syrian refugees left behind, images shared with CARE Syrian refugee volunteers, as captured by their family who have remained behind.

Young Voices From Syria

We asked five young Syrian refugees to share their dreams and a message to the world. What they had to say was both heartbreaking and inspiring.

More than 2.8 million people have fled the country

You can help us reach people in desperate need and support our poverty-fighting programs by making your tax-deductible gift today.

Country Info

CARE began work in Jordan in 1948 to meet the needs of Palestinian refugees displaced with the creation of Israel. Currently, economic participation of women remains lower here than in other countries in the region despite comparatively higher educational attainment. Traditional values that restrict women’s rights are compounded by discrimination in the workplace. Jordan also has one of the lowest levels of water resource availability per capita in the world.

As the population doubles over the next two decades, water scarcity will become an even greater problem and will challenge farmers to improve food security through environmentally sustainable agricultural practices.

Jordan has been host to an estimated 450,000 refugees fleeing violence and insecurity in Iraq and 580,000 refugees to date from the Syria conflict. We are working to meet the needs of poor farmers, women, and these refugees, all affected by conflict, economic disparity, discrimination or a fragile resource base.

Download the Country Factsheet

Our Work in Jordan

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Market Access

More inclusive markets and access can help poor people improve their lives.

Microfinance

There’s a “savings revolution” taking place in many developing countries.

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Violence Against Women

Gender-based violence is one of the most pervasive and yet least-recognized human rights abuses.

Why Women & Girls?

Why does CARE fight global poverty by focusing on women and girls? Because we have to.

LS: Syria Crisis Box 5

Press Release

"Words alone are not enough.”

LS: Syria Crisis Box 6 Women Children

Latest News from JordanSyria

No, There's No Elevator

No, There's No Elevator

“Is there an elevator ?” I’m pretty sure I know the answer to this question before I ask Hanadi, a wheelchair-bound Syrian refugee in her late twenties. She lives with relatives in a multistory apartment building in a poor area of northern Jordan—specifically, on the fourth floor. Unlike thousands of Syrians who have been wounded and permanently disabled during the country’s civil war, Hanadi’s leg problems have been with her since childhood. But the challenges are the same. Right now they take the shape of 60-odd steps between her and the rest of the world.

I Will Raise My Children in This Tent

Image (media): 

A 45-minute drive from Amman, the capital of Jordan, a bumpy road leads to a sea of tents. Children are playing next to big barrels filled with rainwater, rusty cages with chickens and goats, and burning piles of rubbish. Sahab, aged 24, sits on a thin brown mattress in one of the tents. One hand caresses her one-year-old son Khalil’s* hair; the other rests on her belly. In three months Sahab is due to give birth to her second son. ‘I will raise my children in this tent,’ she says,  and sounds as if she had to convince herself of this fact.

School is Not An Option

A dusty road in the city of Irbid in the North of Jordan, about an hour's drive from the Syrian border. Box-shaped houses with small, barred windows are strung together. White colour chips off brown walls, wires are hanging down, rubble piles at the side of the street. Ten year old Maraa lives in one of these houses. A narrow, naked staircase leads to her flat on the second floor. Maraa's mother opens the door and welcomes us into her living room, which serves as both living room and bedroom. Carpets are lying on the cold ground, a light bulb hangs from the ceiling.

I Came Here Because I Need Peace and a Hospital

For three Syrian women who escaped the war, the main thing about Azraq refugee camp is that people are not trying to kill each other. “I cannot see more violence” says Safa (20).

Inside one of thousands of identical white metal huts in the desert, three Syrian women sit on their respective mattresses, handed to them by the UN refugee agency. They have terrible stories to tell.

Winter Storm in Lebanon, Jordan: Concern for Syria refugees paramount, says CARE

Image (media): 

Amman, JORDAN (January 8, 2015)  Syrian refugees, fleeing violence in their homeland, have found their situation exacerbated following the onslaught of winter storm “Huda,” also referred to as “Zeina.”

With temperatures falling below freezing, dark clouds gathered over Lebanon and Jordan Wednesday, carrying heavy winds with driving rain and hail. Snow fell in mountainous areas of Lebanon, and covered Amman and other cities in northern Jordan. 

Syrian Refugees: Warm Hearts in the Cold Winter

Image (media): 

In the northern Jordanian city Irbid, lives Leila, a 60 year-old woman who fled Daraa, Syria more than two years ago when the heavy bombing of her neighborhood was too much to bear. “We survived death,” says Leila. “Everyone who made it was meant to live longer.” Leila’s son was shot dead outside their house in Daraa. A few months later during Ramadan, his wife was shot inside the house while the family was breaking their fast. She died immediately leaving Leila with six orphan children to take care of.

Herald-Tribune: Refugees Flock to Safety in Jordan

Reporter Jessie Van Berkel of the Herald-Tribune traveled to Jordan for two weeks in August as part of a fellowship with the International Center for Journalists funded by the U.S. State Department’s Professional Fellows Program.

While visiting, she spent a day in Azraq Refugee Camp examining the conditions for Syrian refugees. More than three years after the start of the Syrian war, the humanitarian plight of more than 6 million people displaced inside Syria and the 2.8 million refugees scattered in the region is growing more dismal by the day.

Pages