Sometimes We Don't Even Eat - How Conflict and COVID-19 Are Pushing Millions of People to the Brink - CARE

Sometimes We Don’t Even Eat – How Conflict and COVID-19 Are Pushing Millions of People to the Brink

In September 2020, the UNSC invoked Resolution 2417, sounding the alarm on the risk of famine and widespread food insecurity in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), northeast Nigeria, South Sudan, and Yemen due to the cumulative effects of conflict and the COVID-19 pandemic. This report explores the impact that conflict and other crises, including COVID-19, have had on food security in these countries. The report also analyzes the gendered effects of food insecurity in these contexts.

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