Angola

Country Info

CARE started operations in Angola in 1989, focusing on emergency humanitarian assistance including food, health, water, sanitation, and one urban development program. In 2002, when the 30-year civil war ended, CARE’s programs shifted to the areas of rights, good governance and decentralization in both urban and rural areas.

CARE Angola works in the provinces of Luanda, Bie, Kuando Kubango, Cabinda, Benguela, Cunene, Huambo, and Huila. The resource-rich country has a strong potential to become independent from foreign aid, but it will be a challenge to ensure those resources benefit all Angolans. 

Our Work in Angola

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Child Marriage

Child marriage is a gross human rights violation that puts young girls at great risk.

Why Women & Girls?

Why does CARE fight global poverty by focusing on women and girls? Because we have to.

Kididi Hope

Everyone in our neighborhood, which is known as Kididi, calls me "Aunt Maria". I am 46 years old and in twenty years of being in my new home, the neighborhood has grown significantly but not much has changed. We continue to live in poverty, we are still excluded from government plans, we do not have basic services and many of our children cannot continue school after the fourth grade.

CARE gave me hope for a better future for myself and my children; today I am able to give my family what they deserve and I know I can achieve anything.

 

These Are Our Sisters

Gender-based violence is one of the most widespread – but least recognized – human rights abuses in the world. Globally, one out of three women will be beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused in her lifetime. This violence is happening to our sisters, mothers, grandmothers, aunts and daughters around the world.

This violence leaves survivors with long-term psychological and physical trauma; tears away at the social fabric of communities; and is used with terrifying effect in conflict settings, with women as the main target.

Humanitarian Consequences of War

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For more than 50 years, CARE has helped people survive war and rebuild in its aftermath. This work is integral to our poverty-fighting mission because the brutal consequences of war last long after the guns are silent. People cannot overcome poverty when their village has been plundered, when the schoolhouse has been bombed or when the fields' only fruits are deadly landmines.

Humanitarian Consequences of War

Image (media): 

For more than 50 years, CARE has helped people survive war and rebuild in its aftermath. This work is integral to our poverty-fighting mission because the brutal consequences of war last long after the guns are silent. People cannot overcome poverty when their village has been plundered, when the schoolhouse has been bombed or when the fields' only fruits are deadly landmines.

Kididi Hope

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My name is Maria Elisabeth Avindio. In 1989, a war broke out in the area around Andulo – the town where I used to live here in Angola – and my family was in danger living there. My husband decided to stay but sent our son and I to live with relatives in Luanda, the country’s capital and largest city.  It has been ten years since I heard from my husband. I remarried and had two more kids.

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