India

Country Info

CARE has been working in India for more than 60 years, focusing on ending poverty and social injustice. We do this through well-planned and comprehensive programs in health, education, livelihoods and disaster preparedness and response. Our overall goal is the empowerment of women and girls from poor and marginalized communities leading to improvement in their lives and livelihoods. By collaborating with community groups, government departments, and professional bodies, CARE India ensures that the most vulnerable can effect and sustain equitable change.

CARE works with the poorest of the poor in more than 100 districts, in a total of 11 states across India. In 2008, CARE became nationally registered in India, which allows CARE an even greater opportunity to work with national partners and ensure that the poor benefit from India’s new wealth. In 2013, CARE India transitioned from an affliate to a full member of CARE International, a global confederation of member organizations – Austria, Australia, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany-Luxemburg, India, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Peru, Thailand, United Kingdom and United States – working together to end poverty.

For more information or to contact us, please visit the CARE India website.

 

Our Work in India

Child Poverty

Half of all children live in poverty, spending their formative years struggling to survive.  

Market Access

More inclusive markets and access can help poor people improve their lives.

Microfinance

There’s a “savings revolution” taking place in many developing countries.

Youth Empowerment

Addressing the needs of the 1.8 billion young people in the world is critical to ending poverty.

Girls' Education

The majority of the 57 million children out of school are girls — their future is at risk.

Family Planning

Family planning is a proven strategy in reducing maternal mortality.

HIV & AIDS

Poverty is both a cause and consequence of HIV and AIDS.

Child Survival

This year, more than 7 million children will die before their 5th birthday.

Clean Water

Access to clean water and decent toilets saves lives and helps families and communities prosper.

Poverty & Social Justice

Everyone in the world has the right to a life free from poverty, violence and discrimination.

Maternal Health

Hundreds of thousands of women die in pregnancy and childbirth, mostly from preventable causes.

Agriculture

By failing to close the gender gap in agriculture, the world is paying dearly.

Child Nutrition

Malnutrition affects 200 million children and the consequences can last a lifetime.

Child Marriage

Child marriage is a gross human rights violation that puts young girls at great risk.

Violence Against Women

Gender-based violence is one of the most pervasive and yet least-recognized human rights abuses.

Why Women & Girls?

Why does CARE fight global poverty by focusing on women and girls? Because we have to.

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Getting Communities Involved In Setting Priorities and Gathering Data

Getting Communities Involved In Setting Priorities and Gathering Data

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CARE believes in putting communities in the driver's seat to determine what projects should do, and if it's working to meet community needs.  One tool we use to accomplish this is the Participatory Performance Tracker (PPT).  This tool allows groups and individuals to evaluate project outcomes, behavior change, and barriers to success.  Groups at the community level compare objectives to outcomes, to hold themselves, their leaders, and CARE accountable for the goals we've set.  Outside facilitators work with groups to evaluate group dynamics and performance.  To effectively use the PPT, gro

Pathways to Empowerment Increases Food Security For 50,000 Women Farmers

With the generous support of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, CARE’s Pathways Program is based on the conviction that women farmers possess enormous potential to contribute to long-term food security for their families and substantially impact nutritional outcomes in sustainable ways.

CARE Knows How to Turn Mobile Phones into Medical Planners

In the East Indian state of Bihar, high infant and maternal mortality remained daunting challenges. CARE and the Government of Bihar decided to team up to improve family health interventions using something that we are all familiar with: mobile phones.

Here’s how it works:

Frontline Health Workers are equipped with phones and trained on a number of programs that register pregnant women, mothers and newborns for healthcare services. They are also given decision support tools and counseling protocols to increase the quality of health care programs.

The Undulating Journey of Anjum

I am Anjum, a 12-year-old girl from Mewat Region, Haryana of North India. I live in a village which is predominantly Meo Muslim. This is one of the reasons why our village is conservative. In our community, girls are not allowed to step out of houses, forget going to schools. They only go to Madrsa to get religious education. We are forced to work in houses and fields as supporting hands and bringing up our siblings. We are unaware of what the outer world looks like or what the opportunities are for a girl like me.

“Don’t worry, be happy … be safe!”

‘It’s normal Zeba! There is nothing to worry about!’ I was told this repeatedly in the last 4 days and I tried to believe that there was really nothing to worry about. It was four months since I had i had my period and was hopefully looking forward to be a mother. Knowing of my pregnancy, everyone in the house was very happy. I was 20 years old and  pregnant for the first time after three years of marriage which was quite uncommon in my entire extended family. Every  other woman who has wed in our family was blessed with a child within a year.

To Share or Not to Share

This was the question when we started our program with male field staff. As part of their jobs, the male staff were out in communities challenging social norms around gender. But it was tough to talk about it amongst their own peers, because they were afraid their friends would make fun of them. It’s important to create spaces for men to talk about their own experiences, and what gender inequality means for them.   We are all better activists if we believe what we say and are comfortable with it, if we are not afraid of ridicule.

To Share or Not to Share

This was the question when we started our program with male field staff. As part of their jobs, the male staff were out in communities challenging social norms around gender. But it was tough to talk about it amongst their own peers, because they were afraid their friends would make fun of them. It’s important to create spaces for men to talk about their own experiences, and what gender inequality means for them.   We are all better activists if we believe what we say and are comfortable with it, if we are not afraid of ridicule.

My Wife is My Life Companion

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It was difficult for Suneeta to adjust in her In-laws house even after 5 year of her marriage.  She had a 4 year old baby, and her role was very restricted at her in-laws’ home. Her entire day was devoted for house hold chores and taking care of in-laws. Her husband usually came home at late night, and they hardly had anything to share. They almost never talked.

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